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Johnson&Johnson

The FDA has authorized Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 vaccine for emergency use, adding a third vaccination option—one that comes with storage and distribution advantages.

The regulatory decision followed the review of an FDA advisory panel, which voted unanimously on Friday to recommend authorization of the vaccine. J&J said it has begun shipping its vaccines to the federal government, which will manage distribution. The company expects to deliver enough vials for the vaccination of more than 20 million people in the U.S. by the end of March, ramping up to 100 million vaccinations by mid-year.

The J&J shot joins the messenger RNA vaccines developed by Moderna and partners Pfizer and BioNTech as the only authorized Covid vaccines in the U.S. The mRNA vaccines must be transported and stored at ultra-cold temperatures well below temperatures of typical medical freezer equipment. However, vaccination sites now have a little more flexibility in how they can store mRNA vaccines. Last week, the FDA approved a request from Pfizer and BioNTech to permit storage of their vaccine at pharmaceutical-grade freezers for up to two weeks.

The J&J vaccine can be transported and stored at refrigerator temperatures, making it a better option for rural areas or vaccination sites that don’t have the specialized freezer equipment required to store the mRNA vaccines. It has the additional advantage of being a single shot, unlike the mRNA vaccines that are given as two doses weeks apart. A single shot avoids the challenges of getting people to return for a second injection.

“The potential to significantly reduce the burden of severe disease, by providing an effective and well-tolerated vaccine with just one immunization, is a critical component of the global public health response,” Paul Stoffels, J&J’s chief scientific officer, said in a prepared statement. “A one-shot vaccine is considered by the World Health Organization to be the best option in pandemic settings, enhancing access, distribution and compliance.

The J&J vaccine uses a virus to fight a virus. The company’s Janssen subsidiary takes adenovirus, which causes the common cold, and engineers it so that it cannot replicate and does not cause illness. This engineered virus becomes the vehicle that transports into cells a piece of DNA from SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus. Cells use that genetic material to make the spike protein found on the surface of SARS-CoV-2. Those proteins spark the immune response that leads to immunity. This vaccine technology, which J&J calls AdVac, is the basis of the company’s Ebola vaccine, which was approved by the FDA in 2019.

The FDA authorization for J&J’s Covid vaccine was based on results from a global, placebo-controlled Phase 3 study that enrolled nearly 44,000 volunteers. Those participants were followed for a median of eight weeks. The main goal of the study was to evaluate the first occurrence of moderate-to-severe Covid infection with the onset of symptoms after 14 days, and then after the 28-day mark.

Overall, the J&J vaccine was about 67% effective in preventing moderate-to-severe or critical Covid infection after two weeks. After 28 days, the vaccine was about 66% effective at preventing infection. The FDA added that the J&J vaccine was about 77% effective in preventing severe or critical illness two weeks after vaccination. After 28 days, the vaccine was 85% effective in preventing severe or critical illness.

The most common side effects reported from the studies were pain at the injection site, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and nausea. The FDA said these side effects were mostly mild to moderate and lasted for a day or two. J&J does not yet have enough data to determine how long protection from the vaccine lasts. The studies conducted to date also do not show whether the vaccine stops people from transmitting the virus. As part of the emergency authorization, J&J must continue to collect data about its vaccine and report and serious adverse events.

The J&J vaccine is given as a 0.5 mL intramuscular injection. The vaccine is shipped in vials, each containing five doses. The company estimates the vaccine will remain stable for two years stored at minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 20 degrees Celsius). At refrigerator temperatures in the range of 36 to 46 degrees Fahrenheit (2 to 8 degrees Celsius), the company says the vaccine can be stored for up to three months. The company will deliver the vaccine with the same cold chain currently used to ship its other medicines.

The federal government will manage the allocation and distribution of the J&J vaccine according to guidelines set by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Johnson & Johnson said that it plans file an application seeking a formal FDA approval later this year. The company is also seeking authorizations for its vaccine in other markets.

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The U.S. is one step closer to making available another Covid-19 vaccine after a panel of experts voted unanimously Friday to recommend emergency use authorization for a shot developed by Johnson & Johnson.

The independent panel, comprised of mostly physicians, voted 22-0 to support the vaccine with no one abstaining. These votes aren’t binding on the FDA, but the agency often follows the recommendations of its panels. A decision could come as early as this weekend. The two Covid vaccines currently cleared for emergency use received their authorizations the day after their respective advisory panel meetings.

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine would offer an alternative to the ones currently available from the Pfizer and BioNtech alliance, and Moderna. Those messenger RNA vaccines must be distributed and stored at ultra-cold temperatures, then thawed before use. Those shots are given as two doses, weeks apart. The J&J vaccine can be kept at refrigerator temperatures. Another key difference is that the J&J jab requires a single shot. Together, those features will make the J&J vaccine easier to distribute to more people in more places through distribution channels that are already in place.

Panel members expressed support for the J&J vaccine, saying that the safety and efficacy data supported its authorization. But panelists also cautioned the public against picking vaccine favorites.

“It’s important that people do not think one vaccine is better than another,” said Cody Meissner, an infectious disease expert and professor of pediatrics at the Tufts University School of Medicine. “There is no preference for one vaccine over another and all vaccines work with what appears to be equal safety and equal efficacy as of this time.”

Emergency authorization is not the same as an approval. Federal law permits the FDA to allow marketing of unapproved medical products for emergency situations, such as a pandemic. Authorizations only last for the duration of the emergency. These authorizations can also be revoked if new data show that the product is not safe or effective. Stanley Perlman, a professor in the departments of microbiology and immunology at the University of Iowa, said that while the clinical studies to date have produced data about the vaccine’s safety and efficacy, it would be “nice to have more.”

The J&J vaccine may be new, but compared to the mRNA vaccines, the technology behind it has bit of a longer track record. J&J vaccine makes it using its AdVac technology, the same platform that produced the company’s Ebola vaccine, which the FDA approved in 2019. The technology takes the virus that causes the common cold and modifies it so it doesn’t cause illness. That engineered virus is the delivery vehicle that ferries into cells a snippet of genetic code for the novel coronavirus’s spike protein. The genetic material serves as the blueprint from which the body’s cells produce spike proteins. The immune system responds by producing antibodies to those proteins, conferring immunity.

The clinical data to date for J&J Covid vaccine covers 44,000 adults from all over the world. In Phase 3 data reported in late January, the vaccine was 66% effective overall in preventing moderate-to-severe infection, 28 days after vaccination. Furthermore, the vaccine showed 85% efficacy in preventing severe disease, and showed complete protection against Covid-related hospitalization and death, also measured at day 28.

Those marks look inferior to the greater than 90% efficacy demonstrated in mRNA vaccine trials. But cross-trial comparisons are difficult and can be misleading because trials have different designs and different goals. Also, the mRNA studies were conducted earlier in the year when there were fewer variants circulating. Public health experts have said that if those vaccines were tested under current conditions, their efficacy rates might be lower, too.

Plans are already underway to gather more data about J&J’s shot, including a study of the vaccine in children and teens. Johan Van Hoof, the global head of the infectious diseases and vaccines for J&J’s Janssen subsidiary, told the advisory panel that a clinical trial testing the vaccine in those 17 and younger is expected to begin this spring. He also said that the company is assessing how the vaccine responds to variants of the novel coronavirus.

Shortly after Friday’s meeting, the FDA issued a statement saying that it would “rapidly work” with J&J toward finalization and issuance of an emergency use authorization. The agency added that it has notified federal partners involved in the allocation and distribution of vaccines, so that they are ready.

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Johnson & Johnson has formally asked the FDA to allow emergency use of its Covid-19 vaccine as the company seeks to add a third option to the U.S. lineup of vaccines for the novel coronavirus.

The application comes a week after J&J released preliminary data showing 66% overall efficacy in a Phase 3 clinical trial. Those results fall short of the efficacy marks of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer. But the J&J jab offers advantages compared to those vaccines.

Unlike mRNA vaccines, which are given as two doses weeks apart, J&J’s vaccine is a single shot. Also, the J&J vaccine can be kept at refrigerator temperatures. Both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines must be kept frozen—Pfizer’s at ultra-cold temperatures. They’re then thawed and temporarily stored at refrigerator temperatures before dosing.

J&J’s vaccine storage requirements are the same as those for most vaccines, making it an easier fit vaccine distribution channels already in place. The company said that if authorized, its vaccine will ship using the same cold chain technologies it uses for transporting other medicines. Of the vaccine candidates that have advanced to late-stage testing, J&J’s is the only one given as a single dose.

Before the FDA decides whether to grant emergency use authorization to the J&J vaccine, the pharma giant’s candidate must be evaluated by an independent advisory committee to the agency that will evaluate the clinical data and discuss the efficacy and safety risks of the shot. The vaccines from both Moderna and Pfizer went through the same step. The J&J meeting is scheduled for Feb. 26.

J&J’s vaccine, developed by the company’s Janssen division, employs a version of the virus that causes the common cold. That virus is modified so it does not cause illness. It’s used to deliver to cells a snippet of the genetic code for the spike protein, which is prominent on the surface of the novel coronavirus. The cells of the body read that genetic material and make copies of the spike protein. The immune system responds to those copies by making antibodies that protect against Covid-19.

AdVac is the same platform Janssen used to develop an Ebola vaccine that was approved by the FDA in 2019. The technology is also the foundation of experimental Zika, RSV, and HIV vaccines. J&J said that the safety profile observed with its Covid-19 vaccine was consistent with other experimental vaccines based on AdVac.

J&J evaluated its Covid-19 vaccine in a Phase 3 study enrolling 43,783 patients. The main goal was to show protection from moderate to severe disease. There were geographic differences in efficacy rates. The vaccine candidate was most protective in the U.S., where efficacy was 72%, the company said. In Latin America, efficacy was 66%; in South Africa, it was 57% effective. While those marks fell short of the efficacy rates demonstrated by the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, cross trial comparisons are tricky. Also, the J&J studies were done when more variants of the novel coronavirus were circulating compared to when the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines were tested.

Paul Stoffels, J&J’s chief scientific officer, said in a prepared statement that the company has vaccines ready to ship immediately upon receiving emergency authorization.

“With our submission to the FDA and our ongoing reviews with other health authorities around the world, we are working with great urgency to make our investigational vaccine available to the public as quickly as possible,” he said.

In addition to the submission to the FDA, J&J is seeking similar authorizations from health agencies in other countries. The company said an application to the European Medicines Agency will be submitted in coming weeks.

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A second vaccine for Covid-19 has won the blessing of U.S. regulators.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved for emergency use a vaccine developed by Moderna, a biotech company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The green light comes a week after similar approval was given to a vaccine from New York-based Pfizer and its German partner, BioNTech. That first vaccine is already being deployed on the front lines of a pandemic currently claiming more than 3,000 lives a day in the U.S. and stretching the country’s health care resources to a breaking point.

The approval of Moderna’s vaccine means it, too, will soon join the fight against Covid-19. The U.S. has committed to buying 200 million doses of the vaccine, which is administered in two shots, according to the company. Hospitals are expecting deliveries as soon as next week.

“With the availability of two vaccines now for the prevention of Covid-19, the FDA has taken another crucial step in the fight against this global pandemic that is causing vast numbers of hospitalizations and deaths in the United States each day,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen M. Hahn said in a statement.

The initial shipment from Moderna is expected to total 5.9 million doses, more than double the initial 2.9 million doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine.

Further, the Moderna vaccine may pose less of a logistical challenge. Unlike the Pfizer/BioNTech product, it does not need to be stored at extremely low temperatures, enabling it to go more places. 

Moderna plans to make 20 million doses available by the end of December.

“We remain focused on scaling up manufacturing to help us protect as many people as we can from this terrible disease,” Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel said in a statement. He said the vaccine, while developed quickly, is based on a decade of research.

The Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines are based on a similar platform: messenger RNA, which helps human cells create their own antibodies to the Covid-19 virus. Developed in record time, both vaccines are around 95% effective but generate some temporary side effects, including pain at the injection site, fever, joint pain and headaches. Both also require two doses.

More severe reactions are possible as the vaccines are given to a larger population. Two health care workers in Alaska reportedly developed allergic reactions to the Pfizer vaccine, with one requiring hospitalization. This was also observed in the U.K. 

The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine is approved for use in people 16 and over, though members of an FDA advisory panel questioned whether there was enough evidence to support use in those under 18. The Moderna vaccine is approved for those 18 and over.

The age difference led to different outcomes for the vaccines when they came before an FDA advisory panel comprised of outside experts. Panelists were voting on whether the vaccines’ benefits outweighed the risks. The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine was cleared on a 17 to four vote, with one abstention, while the Moderna vaccine was cleared unanimously, also with one abstention. The abstention reflected concern about the broad scope of the question up for approval

“I’m very uncomfortable with the language,” said Michael Kurilla, an infectious disease expert and director of the clinical innovation division at the National Center for Advancing Translation Sciences, a part of the National Institutes of Health.

“I think in the midst of a pandemic and with limited vaccine supply available, a blanket statement for individuals 18 years and older is just too broad,” Kurilla said at the end of the advisory panel meeting on Thursday. “I’m not convinced that for all of those age groups, the benefits do actually outweigh the risks and I would prefer to see it more targeted toward people at high risk of serious and life-threatening Covid disease.”

Another critical question facing the vaccine makers is what to do about people taking part in clinical trials, some of which are expected to last into 2022. The trials are comparing the results in those given the actual vaccine against those given a placebo. Participants are not supposed to know which one they received.

But on a website about their vaccine, Pfizer and BioNTech said they are allowing people who got a placebo in their trial to get the actual vaccine. The offer is limited initially to healthcare workers and nursing-home residents, two groups that have been prioritized for vaccination in the U.S. But it will eventually extend to others. There are nearly 44,000 participants in the Pfizer/BioNTech trial.

Moderna also has a plan for the so-called unblinding of its trial participants, of which there are more than 30,000.

The next vaccine candidates are expected to come before regulators early next year. One candidate is being developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University. Another is from Johnson & Johnson, which said this week it expects to ask for emergency use authorization in February.

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